Xiaoyao and Shuchi: A Few Special Uses of Alliterative and Rhyming Binomes in the Transmitted and Excavated Documents「逍遙」與「舒遟」:連綿詞的幾種特別用法 – 主講:陳致教授,香港浸會大學


Date:

10 Nov 2015

Venue:

E21-1033

Description:

摘要:

在上古漢語中,連綿詞有一些特別的用法,往往未引起學者足夠重視。一般情況下,連綿詞的兩字不能拆開理解和使用。如清代王念孫所云:「凡連語之字,皆上下同義,不可分訓。」從一般意義上來說,這是毋庸置疑的。但在傳世的經典和出土的文獻中,特別是在韻文裡面,連綿詞有些特別的用法,卻並不一定遵循不可拆開的原則。本文通過分析「婀娜」、「逍遙」、「舒夷」等連綿在傳世經典、金文和簡帛文字中的用例,來分析與之相關的一些詞語,以及變化形式。對這些連綿詞的變化形式的理解,既可以幫助我們理解新出土的金文和簡帛文字的一些內容,同時也會幫助重新理解傳世經典中的一些前人難解的或者誤解的文句。

Abstract:

A binome (or bi-syllabic compound) in early archaic Chinese (Old Chinese) is a compound consisting of two relevant morphemic units by and large undecomposable in meaning and pronunciation.  In the words of Qing dynasty philologist, Wang Niansun 王念孫 (1744-1832), “the two characters of an reduplicative expression (binome) both have the same meaning; one cannot separate them and denote them differently”. However, some divisive applications of the binomes in Old Chinese, which is hidden behind the texts, have been overlooked by scholars. There are texts found among the transmitted Classics or inscribed on excavated documents, especially in verse, which exhibit particular uses of alliterative and rhyming binomes that do not necessarily follow the principle of non-separation.

Through the analysis of how binomes such as enuo (graceful and pliant), xiaoyao (free and unfettered) and shuyi (deliberate and reverent), are used in variegated forms within received canonical texts, bronze inscriptions, as well as bamboo and silk manuscripts, the present paper testifies how their variants and several related expressions can help us better understand the inscriptional texts discovered on recently unearthed manuscripts. By attempting this method in this new light, this paper also demonstrates new interpretation of some passages from the received Chinese classics, which had previously been misunderstood or misinterpreted.

Audience:

All are welcome

Language:

Mandarin

Enquiry:

Department of Chinese Language and Literature
Tel: (853) 8822 9259
Email: fah.chinese@um.edu.mo