FAH-DENG Guest Lecture: “Studying scientific metaphor in translation” by Dr. Mark Shuttleworth, UCL, UK


Date:

22 Nov 2016

Venue:

E21-G016

Description:

Abstract:

In 1967, a famous – and controversial – hypothesis about metaphor in translation was advanced by the German scholar Rolf Kloepfer, claiming that it was the bolder and more creative metaphors that were easier to reproduce in other languages. In the session I aim to examine how different types of metaphor in the popular science journal Scientific American (published in Chinese translation under the title科學人) are handled by translators. In my research I have been searching for the best explanation for why different procedures are employed by translators: is Kloepfer’s account the best one available, are there others that may fit the data more closely, or is there possibly no single theoretical rationalisation for the way translators make their decisions? The session will start with some theoretical background and I will also present a selection of genuine examples to illustrate the various points that I hope to make.

 

Biography:

Mark Shuttleworth has been involved in translation studies research and teaching since 1993, first at the University of Leeds, then at Imperial College London, where for many years he was course leader of the MSc in Scientific, Technical and Medical Translation with Translation Technology, and now at University College London. His publications include the Dictionary of Translation Studies, as well as works on metaphor in translation, translation technology, translator training and medical translation. More recently he has been developing an interest in collaborative translation, in particular as it is manifested in Wikipedia. He studied at the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham, and in the last few years has completed a PhD at the University of London. He is a fluent speaker of Russian, German, Polish and French and has some knowledge of a number of other languages, including a small amount of Chinese. As and when time permits he is active as a translator.

Audience:

All are welcome

Language:

English

Enquiry:

FAH - Department of English
Tel: 88224063 / 88228201
Email: fah.english@um.edu.mo