Research


We have a strong team of internationally recognized faculty members engaged in innovative, multi-disciplinary research devoted to bringing about new insights into the fields of English translation, literature, linguistics, and second language acquisition. Research from the department is published in top-tier journals and books in our respective disciplines. Many of our faculty serve as editors to leading journals and book series, and regularly deliver invited talks to internationally renowned conferences and symposia. Currently, our faculty is involved in the following research projects:

  • Research and publication in translation studies has adopted both theoretical and empirical research methods in studying a diverse range of areas: neuro-cognitive translation and interpreting processes, corpus-assisted translation and interpreting studies, translation and interpreting curriculum and pedagogy, literary and cultural translation, translation technology and so forth.
  • Research and publication in literature has focused on a diverse range of works in the following areas: literary modernism, the gothic, Holocaust education, Elizabethan literature, contemporary fiction, film studies concentrating on Chinese film, Romanticism, slave narratives, trauma studies, and literatures relating to postcoloniality and diaspora.
  • Research and publication in linguistics focus on work in the areas of World Englishes, popular culture, sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, cognitive grammar, and language acquisition grammar.
  • Research and publication in SLA focus on theoretical and empirical studies investigating individual differences in language acquisition, language assessment, second language writing, second language listening, classroom discourse, conversation analysis, and cognition and language learning.

 

Latest News for Research Output

 

 

Department of English Prof. Ronald Fong’s linguistics paper contributes to the understanding of Chinese and English resultative constructions and how they are related to human cognition